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September 7, 2007 - AACS LA Announces Security Updates

Advanced Access Content System Licensing Administrator, LLC (“AACS LA”) announces that it has taken action to expire AACS encryption keys being used in an illegitimate product made by an unlicensed party to make unauthorized copies of HD DVD and Blu-ray movies.  In accomplishing this expiration, AACS LA worked closely with the licensee which manufactured the player from which the AACS keys were extracted.  

Consumers can easily continue to enjoy content that is protected by the AACS technology by downloading the latest version of their HD DVD and Blu-ray software players, thereby refreshing the encryption keys associated with those players. Consumers are advised to check with the manufacturer of their AACS-enabled Blu-ray or HD DVD PC-based player to make sure you have installed the latest version. The following manufacturer has provided a link to provide relevant information and facilitate consumer updating of their players:

CyberLink – publishers of PowerDVD products http://www.cyberlink.com/multi/patch/index.jsp

 

September 7, 2007 – AACS LA Announces Commencement of “Proactive Renewal”

AACS LA announces that it has started periodic “proactive renewals”, which, primarily for software player applications, provide for periodic renewal and refreshing of AACS encryption keys by licensed manufacturers and eventual expiration of old keys by AACS LA.  This helps maintain the AACS technology as a vital means of distributing valuable high definition content to consumers.  Consumers should expect that updates/patches will be periodically offered by their software manufacturer in order to ensure that the players continue to function as intended.  The upgrading of software is a common practice in the software industry.  Pursuant to the AACS technology licenses, manufacturers of software players are required to perform such updates in a consumer-friendly fashion.

May 7, 2007

AACS LA began several weeks ago sending letters to parties trafficking in tools used to circumvent AACS technology on Blu-ray and HD DVD movie discs.  The letters requested the removal solely of illegal circumvention tools, including encryption keys, from a number of web sites.  AACS LA recognizes the value of active public discussion and commentary related to these issues, and has not requested the removal or deletion of any such discussion or commentary.  AACS LA is encouraged by the cooperation it has received thus far from the numerous web sites that have chosen to address their legal obligations in a responsible manner.


April 16, 2007 - AACS LA Announces Security Updates (Updated URLs)

In response to attacks against certain PC-based applications for playing HD DVD and Blu-ray movie discs, Advanced Access Content System Licensing Administrator, LLC (“AACS LA”) announces that it has taken action, in cooperation with relevant manufacturers, to expire the encryption keys associated with the specific implementations of AACS-enabled software.

Consumers can continue to enjoy content that is protected by the AACS technology by refreshing the encryption keys associated with their HD DVD and Blu-ray software players. This refresh process is accomplished via a straightforward online update.

Through this online update process, manufacturers are also able to see that consumers update their player implementations prior to distribution of encryption key expiration information via new movie discs.

Consumers are advised to check with the manufacturer of their AACS-enabled Blu-ray or HD DVD PC-based player to make sure you have installed the latest version. The following manufacturers have provided links to provide relevant information and facilitate consumer updating of their players:

Corel – publishers of WinDVD products http://www.corel.com/servlet/Satellite/us/en/Content/1254155336055

 

CyberLink – publishers of PowerDVD products http://www.cyberlink.com/multi/patch/index.jsp

February 15, 2007

Regarding the reported attacks on 2/13/2007, AACS has confirmed that an additional key (called a “processing key”) has been published on public websites without authorization. This is a variation of the previously reported attack (a compromise of a specific implementation) on one or more players sold by AACS licensees. Although a different key was extracted, this represents no adverse impact on the ability of the AACS ecosystem to address the attack. All technical and legal measures applicable to the previously reported attack will be applicable against this attack as well.


January 24, 2007

AACS LA has confirmed that AACS Title Keys have appeared on public web sites without authorization. Such unauthorized disclosures indicate an attack on one or more players sold by AACS licensees. This development is limited to the compromise of specific implementations, and does not represent an attack on the AACS system itself, nor is it exclusive to any particular format. Instead it illustrates the need for all AACS licensees to follow the Compliance and Robustness Rules set forth in the AACS license agreements to help ensure that product implementations are not compromised. AACS LA employs both technical and legal measures to deal with attacks such as this one, and AACS LA is using all appropriate remedies at its disposal to address the attack.

AACS LA Notice to All Licensees: AACS Holidays for Remainder of 2006»